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Prism Lenses

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How Prism Lenses Can Help in Vision Therapy

What Are Prism Lenses?

Most patients who need eyeglasses to address nearsightedness or farsightedness are prescribed a combination of spherical and cylindrical lenses. These provide patients with perfect focus by correcting for refractive errors so light is correctly focused on the retina.

Some people, however, require prism lenses. That’s because their binocular vision — the eyes working together to focus on a single object or image — is not well developed. When the eyes don’t work in tandem, an object seen by one eye may appear higher, lower, or to the right or left of its actual location, leading to double vision.

Prism lenses address double vision by bending light rays onto the retina. This allows the two eyes to now perceive the object as a single image, removing the double vision, these lenses will also correct for refractive errors, so the patient sees clearly as well.

Vision Therapy Using Prism Lenses

Prisms are an integral part of vision therapy, which consists of customized exercises and lenses to improve visual skills and processing by retraining the brain and eyes to work together. Prisms will also improve patients’ 3D depth perception and spatial perception.

If you experience double vision, imbalance and depth-perception problems following an illness or head injury, schedule an appointment with our optometric team to discuss how vision therapy involving prisms might help. During the therapy sessions our optometric team will fit you with prism glasses, provide instruction and ask what you are seeing and experiencing. These responses will provide our optometric team with valuable information on the prisms’ effectiveness.

To test your balance and depth perception, you might be asked to walk to a wall or down the office’s corridor or to hold an object and look at the top of it from an arm’s length distance. While walking or holding the object, your peripheral vision might be tested by identifying objects on either side while keeping your head steady. Another balance/coordination exercise could involve looking straight ahead while slowly walking, step by step, toe to heel.

Vision therapy employs a combination of prisms of various strengths. The lenses and the exercises stimulate your brain, gradually developing a stronger eye-brain connection. Your eyes will learn to work together again to regain clear and comfortable vision. This, in turn, will lead to improved balance and coordination, even when prisms are no longer used.

At Aspire Vision Care we will gladly answer your questions about the role prism lenses play in vision therapy.

Our practice serves patients from Round Rock, TX, Pflugerville, Cedar Park, and Georgetown, Texas and surrounding communities.

References:

 

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Can Vision Therapy Can Help You! 512-399-4626
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Syntonic Phototherapy

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Syntonic Phototherapy | Restoring Visual Function and Balance Through Light

Using light as a healing tool may sound like a foreign concept, but is actually more common than one would expect. For example, physicians use blue light therapy to treat infants born with jaundice and use white light to treat Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD). Dentists use light therapy to bond teeth. Optometrists may use syntonic phototherapy to treat visual dysfunctions.

What Is Syntonic Phototherapy?

Syntonic phototherapy is the use of specific frequencies and wavelengths of light to improve balance in the body’s regulatory centers. Doctors have been using syntonic therapy for over 80 years to treat amblyopia (lazy eye), strabismus (eye turn) and focusing/ convergence problems.

This unique therapy benefits more than vision and can help with learning disorders, chronic headaches, or reducing the effects of brain injuries, stress, trauma and concussion. Syntonic phototherapy is effective when directed under the guidance of a neuro-optometrist, so have a conversation with our optometric team to see whether you can benefit as well.

How Is the Balance of the Nervous System Restored?

“Syntony” means balance, and in this case refers to the balance of an integrated nervous system. The autonomic nervous system consists of the sympathetic (“fight or flight”) and parasympathetic (“rest and digest”) nervous system. The colored light used in syntonic phototherapy stimulates the visual system which, in turn, changes the biochemistry of the brain. The color used to stimulate this change depends on the specific condition of the patient. For example, red light stimulates the sympathetic nervous system while blue light stimulates the parasympathetic nervous system.

To monitor the change and treatment progress, the pupil reaction, functional visual field and binocularity measured before and during a phototherapy session. Once the balance of the two systems is restored, the results are usually long-lasting.

What are the Benefits of Syntonic Phototherapy?

Syntonic phototherapy is often used in conjunction with vision therapy, eyeglasses, or optical aids and has been shown to achieve any of the following results:

  • Improved visual acuity and contrast
  • Improved visual attention
  • Increased energy
  • Improved quality of sleep and digestion
  • Increased relaxation
  • Reduced eye strain
  • Reduced light/allergic sensitivity
  • Improved diet and appetite
  • Reduced cravings for sugar, caffeine, and smoking
  • Improved reproductive functions
  • Some weight loss, despite greater yet more appropriate appetite

Every patient responds differently to treatment since all brains are unique, but most are surprised at the gains acquired. If you are interested in hearing more about syntonic phototherapy or if you have any questions, don’t hesitate to call Aspire Vision Care and schedule a consultation.

Our practice serves patients from Round Rock, TX, Pflugerville, Cedar Park, and Georgetown, Texas and surrounding communities.
Meet Our Vision Therapy Doctor
Can Vision Therapy Can Help You! 512-399-4626
Learn More About Vision Therapy
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Brock String Exercise

A Brock string is a common tool used in vision therapy. It’s made up of a flexible white rope or string that’s about 10 to 15 feet long, that is lined up with colored wooden beads that move along the length of the string. Patients with convergence insufficiency, amblyopia (lazy eye) and strabismus (eye turn) commonly use the Brock string to strengthen specific visual skills.

There are two types of problems with the vergence system: those at close range and at a distance. To maintain clear, single vision, convergence and divergence skills must be quick, accurate, and consistent. Symptoms of a vergence dysfunction include double vision, blurred vision, headaches, and visual discomfort. Furthermore, vergence dysfunction impairs the visual-vestibular pathway, resulting in dizziness and balance issues.

What Is the Purpose of the Brock String Exercise?

The goal of the Brock string exercise is to help patients with vergence problems develop convergence skills and disrupt suppression.

Moreover, this exercise can be used as a diagnostic tool, providing instant feedback on whether their eyes are working as a team to focus on an object at various distances.

The Brock string is made up of two strings (each of which has beads affixed to them) that enter a central bead and two strings that leave it, creating a large“X”. As part of the exercise, patients are requested to alternate fixation and focus from one bead to the next while maintaining awareness of physiological diplopia. For example, patients may be instructed to fixate on a near bead, and if they see double, this indicates a problem with eye teaming. At this point, the patient will be instructed to move the bead closer or further away until he or she sees only one bead. To strengthen the visual skill, the patient will repeat this exercise several times over.

The activity can be altered to make it easier or more difficult by bringing the beads closer/further to the nose and/or by employing lenses and prisms.

Why is the Brock String Important in Vision Therapy?

The Brock string exercise can be used to diagnose and treat visual problems, including lazy eye, convergence insufficiency and other deficiencies in a person’s visual skills. This is critical since these issues can cause eye strain, headaches, blurry vision, balance issues and other problems. A concussion or other type of brain injury can also induce these same symptoms.

The Brock string exercise is divided into two parts: convergence and suppression.

Convergence occurs when both eyes are not focused correctly; they focus behind an object rather than directly on it. So in this context, a person with convergence insufficiency may struggle to maintain their focus on a single bead. If this is one of your issues, you may be experiencing eye strain or double vision.

Suppression occurs when the brain disregards the signals that one of the eyes sends to the brain. When looking at a Brock string you may only see one string instead of two, or one string may appear and then disappear. You will only see one field of vision, which may affect your balance and peripheral vision.

While the Brock string has numerous applications, it is not a do-it-yourself project; you will have the best results under the supervision of a vision therapy optometrist. Contact Aspire Vision Care to learn more about the Brock string exercise and vision therapy.

Our practice serves patients from Round Rock, TX, Pflugerville, Cedar Park, and Georgetown, Texas and surrounding communities.
Meet Our Vision Therapy Doctor
Can Vision Therapy Can Help You! 512-399-4626
Learn More About Vision Therapy
dry eye quiz thubnail.jpg

Children Vision Assessment

Vision Therapy Can Improve Reading Skills In Children Thumbnail.jpg

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What Conditions Can Vision Therapy Help Treat Thumbnail.jpg

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Exercises and Tools Used In Vision Therapy Thumbnail.jpg

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